2 Out Of 3 People With Allergies Are Allergic to Grass

There are many different types of grasses around you, and some have pollen that can cause bothersome symptoms for people with allergies. Your uncomfortable symptoms of grass allergies happen when your immune system reacts too strongly to pollen. These symptoms include:

  • Sneezing
  • Runny or itchy nose
  • Nasal congestion
  • Itchy and watery eyes

Most people who experience the symptoms of grass allergies are allergic to more than 1 type of grass. Five of the most common grasses that can cause allergies are sweet vernal grass, orchard grass, perennial ryegrass, timothy grass, and Kentucky bluegrass. These grasses can be found just about everywhere in the United States.

5 common grasses that cause allergies that are contained in ORALAIR are sweet vernal grass, orchard grass, perennial ryegrass, timothy grass, and Kentucky bluegrass

These grasses are all related, but laboratory studies have shown that your body’s immune system may be able to tell these grasses apart. And you may react differently to these grasses than someone else who is also allergic to grass. Talk to your allergy specialist if you would like more information about the grasses you are allergic to.

A Different Kind of Allergy Immunotherapy

ORALAIR is an allergy immunotherapy treatment that you can take at home. It is needle-free, so you take it by placing the tablet under your tongue. By taking ORALAIR every day, beginning about 4 months before the grass allergy season and continuing it throughout the grass allergy season, you may reduce your grass allergy symptoms and take less allergy medicine during the grass allergy season. In fact, in medical studies, people taking ORALAIR reported less severe allergy symptoms and took less allergy medicine than people not taking ORALAIR. For more information about how ORALAIR works, click here.

ORALAIR can cause severe allergic reactions that may be life-threatening. Symptoms of allergic reactions to ORALAIR include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Throat tightness or swelling
  • Trouble swallowing or speaking
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Rapid or weak heartbeat
  • Severe stomach cramps or pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Severe flushing or itching of the skin

If any of these symptoms occur, stop taking ORALAIR and immediately seek medical care. For home administration of ORALAIR, your doctor should prescribe auto-injectable epinephrine for you to keep at home for treating a severe reaction, should one occur. Your doctor will train and instruct you on the proper use of auto-injectable epinephrine.

Please see additional Important Safety Information below and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.

Getting Through Grass Allergy Season

Whether or not you are taking medicine for your grass allergies, the spring and summer months can be a challenging time. Here are some tips to help make the next grass allergy season easier to handle:

  • Visit pollen.com to check the day's pollen forecast in your area. This can help you anticipate when your symptoms might be at their worst
  • Keep the doors and windows in your house and car closed on days when the pollen count is high
  • Have someone else mow the lawn
  • Take off the clothes you've worn outside, and don't hang laundry outdoors to dry
  • Keep the air clean by turning on the air conditioning in your home and car and using high-efficiency filters in your heating and cooling system
  • Use a HEPA filter in your vacuum—it cleans the air when you use it
  • Rinse your sinuses with saline solution to help relieve your stuffy nose and flush the mucus and allergens from your nose

Important Safety Information

ORALAIR can cause severe allergic reactions that may be life-threatening. Symptoms of allergic reactions to ORALAIR include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Throat tightness or swelling
  • Trouble swallowing or speaking
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Rapid or weak heartbeat
  • Severe stomach cramps or pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Severe flushing or itching of the skin

If any of these symptoms occur, stop taking ORALAIR and immediately seek medical care. For home administration of ORALAIR, your doctor should prescribe auto-injectable epinephrine for you to keep at home for treating a severe reaction, should one occur. Your doctor will train and instruct you on the proper use of auto-injectable epinephrine.

Do not take ORALAIR if you or your child:

  • Has severe, unstable, or uncontrolled asthma;
  • Had a severe allergic reaction in the past that included trouble breathing, dizziness or fainting, or rapid or weak heartbeat;
  • Has ever had difficulty with breathing due to swelling of the throat or upper airway after using any sublingual immunotherapy before;
  • Has ever been diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis; or
  • Is allergic to any of the inactive ingredients contained in ORALAIR.

Stop taking ORALAIR and contact your doctor if you or your child has any mouth surgery procedures (such as tooth removal), develops any mouth infections, ulcers or cuts in the mouth or throat, or has heartburn, difficulty swallowing, pain with swallowing, or chest pain that does not go away or worsens.

In children and adults, the most commonly reported side effects were itching of the mouth, lips, tongue or throat. These side effects, by themselves, are not dangerous or life-threatening.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Talk to your doctor before using ORALAIR while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide, for additional important safety information.

Important Safety Information

ORALAIR can cause severe allergic reactions that may be life-threatening. Symptoms of allergic reactions to ORALAIR include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Throat tightness or swelling
  • Trouble swallowing or speaking
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Rapid or weak heartbeat
  • Severe stomach cramps or pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Severe flushing or itching of the skin

If any of these symptoms occur, stop taking ORALAIR and immediately seek medical care. For home administration of ORALAIR, your doctor should prescribe auto-injectable epinephrine for you to keep at home for treating a severe reaction, should one occur. Your doctor will train and instruct you on the proper use of auto-injectable epinephrine.

Do not take ORALAIR if you or your child:

  • Has severe, unstable, or uncontrolled asthma;
  • Had a severe allergic reaction in the past that included trouble breathing, dizziness or fainting, or rapid or weak heartbeat;
  • Has ever had difficulty with breathing due to swelling of the throat or upper airway after using any sublingual immunotherapy before;
  • Has ever been diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis; or
  • Is allergic to any of the inactive ingredients contained in ORALAIR.

Stop taking ORALAIR and contact your doctor if you or your child has any mouth surgery procedures (such as tooth removal), develops any mouth infections, ulcers or cuts in the mouth or throat, or has heartburn, difficulty swallowing, pain with swallowing, or chest pain that does not go away or worsens.

In children and adults, the most commonly reported side effects were itching of the mouth, lips, tongue or throat. These side effects, by themselves, are not dangerous or life-threatening.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Talk to your doctor before using ORALAIR while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide, for additional important safety information.